2 Sam. 15; 2 Cor. 8; Ezek. 22; Ps. 69

Are you a robber? I’m recovering…

In the midst of a very severe trial, their overflowing joy and their extreme poverty welled up in rich generosity. 2 Corinthians 8:2

Recently, one of my former students contacted me to seek my thoughts on a leadership opportunity at the university. I suggested coffee during the meeting, and her response was “I’ll bring the coffee… What’s your coffee order? And, before you say no, I would really appreciate being able to do something for someone else, even something small like a cup of coffee.” My typical response would be to fight the offer, insisting that it was the responsibility of the more senior person to handle such details. But it occurred to me… I’ve experienced the indescribable joy when I can pay for someone’s meal or offer someone something they need that I have. By not allowing others to do the same for me, was I unconsciously robbing them of a blessing? Even if it was “something small like a cup of coffee”?

Reading this passage of scripture and reflecting on past experiences had me consider that every act of generosity offers the opportunity for a triple blessing… first, a blessing for a need met. Second, giving someone an opportunity to feel grateful. And third, building unity. The first blessing of meeting needs is obvious, so let’s look more closely at the other two, less apparent gifts.

Feeling gratitude is a gift in itself because it soothes our heart and addresses deep emotions. Remember the last time you felt it? Like curling up in a blanket in front of a fire while a snowstorm raged outside… gratitude is sweet.

As for building unity, generosity and gratitude work together. As we receive someone’s generosity, our gratitude pulls us beyond our needs and inspires us to pass along the treasure of generosity however we’re able. In this way, generosity and gratitude pair beautifully to overcome many wants and increases the joy of both the giver and receiver.

Second Corinthians 8:2 says, “They are being tested by many troubles, and they are very poor. But they are also filled with abundant joy, which has overflowed in rich generosity.” When we’re in a position of want, or when we’re the one giving, we learn the give-and-take relationship that God intended as a means of meeting needs and serving each other.

We will all have opportunities to give and receive, and we’d do well to learn to do both with respect. As Paul wrote in 8:14, “Right now you have plenty and can help those who are in need. Later, they will have plenty and can share with you when you need it. In this way, things will be equal.” As we experience the roles of giver and receiver, we come to understand each other’s struggles better. In this way, unity is nurtured. And where there’s unity, there’s more generosity, and the gift keeps giving!

Jesus… what better words to say to You than ‘thank you’, for without Your example and sacrifice, our lives would surely look and be very different. You are the original gift that keeps giving, and I am grateful for the opportunity to learn from the best.”

Greg (gstefanelli)

3 Comments

Filed under 2 Corinthians, 66 Books, ESV Through the Bible in a Year, M'Cheyne Bible reading plan, New Testament

3 responses to “2 Sam. 15; 2 Cor. 8; Ezek. 22; Ps. 69

  1. Thank you, Kathy… I’m find that God is testing me a LOT… giving me opportunities to change, rather than just *changing* me! In the movie Evan Almighty, there’s a scene that is reminding me so much of this… it might help to see it yourself… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ikes4yPulmI

    I find it hard *not* to beat myself up for starting my growth process and relationship with God so late in life. I know the *when* is not as important as taking the steps needed to grow. But, I can’t help wonder where I’d be now had I continued attending a youth group I was introduced to when I was 17…

  2. I love that clip and that God opens our eyes everyday to new ways of seeing how He is at work in and around us. I liked one of today’s verses that went straight to my heart (2 Corinthians 12:14): “I do not want what is yours but you.” Paul wrote what He had learned from the Father. God doesn’t want my stuff. That’s nothing; He wants me, to be with me! That was such good news for me in a season when family members are arguing about who gets what of an elder’s possessions. I can walk away with “nothing” and joy. It’s one of those opportunities you speak of.

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