Author Archives: gardnlady

Judges 4; Acts 8; Jeremiah 17; Mark 3

13 Jesus went up on a mountainside and called to him those he wanted, and they came to him. 14 He appointed twelve[a] that they might be with him and that he might send them out to preach 15 and to have authority to drive out demons. 16 These are the twelve he appointed: Simon (to whom he gave the name Peter), 17 James son of Zebedee and his brother John (to them he gave the name Boanerges, which means “sons of thunder”), 18 Andrew, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, James son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot 19 and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him.

Jesus chose his first disciples and calls them to follow. That was over 2,000 years ago.  He is still calling disciples today.  That would include me.  What does it take to be a disciple of Jesus?

First, we need to accept he is who he says he is. Jesus is the Son of God, part of the Trinity.  He came to earth in human form “to save the lost”.  The disciples walked with him, watched him, learned from him.  They got to know him intimately as he freely shared himself with them.  Have you ever noticed the more you are around someone, you tend to pick up some of their habits?  As a disciple, we see Jesus’ love for others, his kindness, and his compassion. He modeled it daily as we read in the Bible.  When we choose to know him personally and follow his example, we are his disciples.  We are learning his ways, following his teaching.  Then we share what he’s taught us with others. And they share the Good News with others, and so it has gone for generations.  The disciples gave up everything, including their lives, to follow Jesus. We are expected to do nothing less.

While I was reading through Acts 8, it talked about Philip. This Philip was not the same man as the Apostle chosen by Christ.  He is known as “Philip the Evangelizer” as I read in one text note.  He was a disciple of Christ chosen by The Twelve along with Stephen and others to care for the widows (Acts 6).  After the stoning of Stephen, the believers scrambled and Philip went to Samaria.

Philip went down to a city in Samaria and proclaimed the Messiah there. When the crowds heard Philip and saw the signs he performed, they all paid close attention to what he said.

The eunuch asked Philip, “Tell me, please, who is the prophet talking about, himself or someone else?” 35 Then Philip began with that very passage of Scripture and told him the good news about Jesus.

God had an assignment for Philip in Samaria. He directed him to a coach where a eunuch was reading a text from Isaiah about Jesus death.  Philip was able to explain about the prophecy of Jesus in the bible and share the good news of saving grace to him.  He was then able to baptize him and witness the Holy Spirit being given to this man.  The eunuch then went off rejoicing over what had happened to him.  It reminded me of a certain woman from Samaria who had an encounter with Jesus that changed her life and she couldn’t stop herself from sharing the good news.

As disciples we are given the opportunity to see changed lives because of Jesus. Just as our own lives have been changed by Him, we can share our testimony with others.  I have no doubt the eunuch did just that because of one disciple—Philip—who obeyed an angel of the Lord. When we are called, will we go?  Oh, I don’t want to miss what God has in store for me!

Lord, I am so very glad you said to me “come” and I did. You changed my life.  I am grateful for the opportunities you give me to share who you are with others.  Let us rejoice just as the eunuch in Acts did and just as I did the day I believed. May we be covered in your dust from following so closely.  Amen

Cindy (gardnlady)

 

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Joshua 9; Psalm 140, 141; Jeremiah 3; Matthew 17

Josh 9:14 The Israelites sampled their provisions but did not inquire of the LORD.

 

Matt 17:19-21  Then the disciples came to Jesus in private and asked, “Why couldn’t we drive it out?”

He replied, “Because you have so little faith. I tell you the truth, if you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there’ and it will move.  Nothing will be impossible for you.”

What is missing in both of these passages? I believe it is prayer.

In the first passage, the Israelites were deceived by the Gibeonites.   In fear of God and what he had done in Jericho and Ai, the Gibeonites did not want to be destroyed so they pretended to have come a long distance and that they were not a neighbor in the land of Canaan—the land God had promised to the Israelites.  I think because of their previous victories in these countries, there was a little pride in them.  They knew God was with them.  They looked at the evidence presented and believed what they saw and what the Gibeonites said.  So, they made a treaty with them not to harm them.  They swore by the name of God.  It tells us no one ever stopped to pray to God to see what He had to say about all of this.

In the second passage, the disciples had been healing people and driving out demons in Jesus name. Yet they faced one demon in particular that they were unable to rebuke.  The father was desperate and came to Jesus with his son when the disciples were unable to help him.  Jesus healed the boy immediately.  Later they asked Jesus why this one was difficult for them.  His reply was “Because you have so little faith.”

Paul tells us in 2 Cor 5:7 “for we walk by faith, not by sight.” (ESV)  I found this definition of what it means to walk by faith that really gave me a better understanding of this: To walk by faith is to walk in a spirit of prayerful dependence on the Lord and His guidance. (Commentary on Joshua 9, Bible.org)  It is how Jesus daily lived his life.  He was in constant contact with God and he tells us many times he does only what he’s instructed to do by the Father.  Prayerful dependence.

The Israelites believed what they saw and they were deceived. That can easily happen to us.  We have an enemy who wants nothing more than to deceive us and keep us from living the life God has planned for us.  We need the Holy Spirit to be active in our lives and that only comes from prayer.  Each day we need to be on alert.  We need to get our marching orders from God and never trust things to be as they appear.

The disciples started doubting their ability to do what Jesus had told them to do. What they had done for others was not working this time.  They were walking by sight (I can’t do this). Their faith was weak in the power Jesus had given them. Isn’t that just like something I would do?  I have been blessed by God to do something and soon I am trying to do it in my own power instead of including Him, by praying first?  And then I wonder why I am not succeeding?  I don’t believe Jesus was talking about a literal mountain in this verse (although he could have been) but I think he was referring to the trials we face–the ones that seem insurmountable, like mountains, looming before us.  When we are walking by faith, in prayerful dependence of God, we can handle anything that comes our way.  As Jesus said, “Nothing will be impossible for you.”  I fall short of believing in the power I have been given as well.  Without prayer, I have no faith.

Lord, sometimes I forget how very much I need you and try to live life on my own. It never works.  Instead of moving mountains, I keep walking around the same ones and get stuck.  Only through prayerful dependence on you can I accomplish anything.  Only by constant contact with you can I avoid deception.  Lord Jesus, be ever near.  Amen

Cindy (gardnlady)

 

 

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Deuteronomy 28:20-68; Psalm 119:25-48; Isaiah 55; Matthew 3

Lately I’ve been contemplating the reason for the lack of contentment I feel in my life at times. I have to admit there are times I am not satisfied with my life.  Now in some instances, this can be a good thing.  If I am not growing in my walk with God, I should be dissatisfied.  If I am living outside of God’s will and know it, I should be dissatisfied.  If I see injustice in the world or in the lives of those I love, I should be dissatisfied.  This dissatisfaction is God’s righteousness at work in me and should push me to action.  That is not the kind of dissatisfaction that is plaguing me.

27 Cause me to understand the way of your precepts, that I may meditate on your wonderful deeds. 28 My soul is weary with sorrow; strengthen me according to your word. 29 Keep me from deceitful ways;  be gracious to me and teach me your law.

As this has marinated in my mind, I realized this dissatisfaction comes from a place of pride—utter self-centeredness and entitlement. In other words–SIN. In my own eyes, I don’t “see” God working in my life.  In all honesty, what I mean by that is He isn’t doing what I want Him to do.  There is nothing big going on in my life, and I’m not doing great things for the kingdom.   I am becoming impatient with waiting for God to answer some prayers.  I am comparing what I perceive Him to be doing in someone else’s life against what I perceive Him to be doing in mine.  In slips dissatisfaction for what I don’t have instead of gratitude for what I do (forbidden fruit ring a bell???).  There is no doubt I make a pretty lousy God yet that is what I have done—elevated my own self above God.  Oh Lord, forgive me!

33 Teach me, Lord, the way of your decrees, that I may follow it to the end.[b]  34 Give me understanding, so that I may keep your law and obey it with all my heart. 35 Direct me in the path of your commands,  for there I find delight. 36 Turn my heart toward your statutes and not toward selfish gain.

I am not very proud to admit this and have had to repent before the Lord. But we have a loving God who corrects and never shames.  He reminded me of a few things.  This very morning the sun rose as it always does.  I woke up in a nice, comfy bed in a nice cool house that He provided.  My heart is working, my brain is working, my lungs are working, and my muscles are working.  As I sip my tea, I look out at my yard that is filled with summer flowers in radiant colors and listen to birds filling the air with their songs.  Then I go to my job, a job He provided.  During the course of the day I had abundant food, I laughed with friends, and I got hugs from healthy grandchildren. God created the universe and He created my body.  Everything in this world is an example of His work.  He is constantly at work despite what my self-centered self thinks.

“For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the Lord. “As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.

Keeping my eyes fixed on Him, His creation, and His provision gives me clear sight into the work He is doing in my life. The world has programmed us for bigger, better, more spectacular in everything to show off.  God chooses to work through the tiny, miniscule details.  He works through the Holy Spirit inside of us to change us.  It is not something we can see. Filling my thoughts with gratitude for who He is and what Jesus did for us leaves no room for dissatisfaction.  It causes nothing but praise to come to mind.

41 May your unfailing love come to me, Lord, your salvation, according to your promise;

Lord, spending time with you gives me great satisfaction. When I submit to the truth that You are God and I am not, I have set my life back in its proper order.  Every day you are busily at work.  When I am still and allow my eyes to focus on You, I can see this clearly.  How blessed I am that You love me despite my sin.  Thank you.  In Jesus name I pray, Amen

Cindy (gardnlady)

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Deuteronomy 13,14; Psalm 99-101; Isaiah 41; Revelation 11

“But you, Israel, my servant, Jacob, whom I have chosen, you descendants of Abraham my friend, I took you from the ends of the earth, from its farthest corners I called you.  I said, ‘You are my servant’; I have chosen you and have not rejected you. 10 So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God.  I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.” (NIV)

God has made so many promises to us through His Word. Sometimes it is difficult to know if they are promises specifically to the Israelites or if they are promises for all of us.  This promise in Isaiah is one we can all cling to, and I have, on many occasions.  At first, it would appear to be directed at the Israelites with reference to Israel and Jacob, but “you descendants of Abraham my friend” is referring to the believers in Christ as well.  Galatians 3:29 addresses this:  “And now that you belong to Christ, you are the true children of Abraham. You are his heirs, and God’s promise to Abraham belongs to you.” (NLT)  This is a promise for all of us.

I love that God calls Abraham his friend.  A true friend is someone you confide in, laugh with, and enjoy their company.  You feel safe with them, bare your soul, and share your life.  You spend time together and a deep affection for one another. This is the kind of relationship God wants to have with us.

Jesus calls himself our friend. In John 15:13 he tells us “greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” He revealed to us everything he learned from the Father.  He did not keep secrets from us.  He willingly sacrificed his life on our behalf.

How comforting it is to take his promise to heart!  God is with us ALWAYS.  He strengthens us, He helps us, and He upholds us!  No matter what we are going through, He is part of it.  We never have to face anything alone.  He never rejects us or abandons us.  He has given us His Word!  Therefore:

Shout with joy to the Lord, all the earth!  2Worship the Lord with gladness. Come before Him, singing with joy. 3Acknowledge that the Lord is God!  He made us, and we are his.[a] We are his people, the sheep of his pasture. Enter his gates with thanksgiving; go into his courts with praise. Give thanks to him and praise his name. For the Lord is good.  His unfailing love continues forever, and his faithfulness continues to each generation. (NLT)

He is faithful, his promises are true, and his word is trustworthy—he deserves our praise.  Why is praising God so difficult for us?  We don’t seem to have a problem praising athletes or celebrities.  Their feats are nothing compared to those of our LORD. When I praise Him, I find I have taken the focus off of ME and put it on HIM where it belongs.  My burdens seem lighter—even though I may have tears streaming down my face as I lift my hands or fall to my knees.  His presence is more keenly felt.  I know I can talk about anything, I can complain, grapple issues, and share my joys.  Praise puts God in His Kingdom.  There have been times when I’ve felt so immersed in praise that it was almost as if I were standing before His throne—just me and Him.  I don’t understand why I don’t praise more often.

Father, when life is going good it is easy to praise you. But I want to be able to praise you no matter what is happening.  I know you alone are God whether life is calm or stormy.  Forgive me for the times I doubt and for the times I question your goodness.  While you are my friend, you are still God.  Your power is greater than anything.  I thank you for your strength in times of my weakness. Thank you for being my ever-present help in time of need. Thank you for upholding me above my enemies.  You alone are good.  Amen

Cindy (gardnlady)

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Numbers 21; Psalm 60, 61; Isaiah 10:5-34; James 4

They traveled from Mount Hor along the route to the Red Sea,[c] to go around Edom. But the people grew impatient on the way; they spoke against God and against Moses, and said, “Why have you brought us up out of Egypt to die in the wilderness? There is no bread! There is no water! And we detest this miserable food!”

Then the Lord sent venomous snakes among them; they bit the people and many Israelites died. The people came to Moses and said, “We sinned when we spoke against the Lord and against you. Pray that the Lord will take the snakes away from us.” So Moses prayed for the people.

The Lord said to Moses, “Make a snake and put it up on a pole; anyone who is bitten can look at it and live.” So Moses made a bronze snake and put it up on a pole. Then when anyone was bitten by a snake and looked at the bronze snake, they lived.

Selfish; self-centered; entitled. These are all words that came to mind as I read through these verses and the attitude of the Israelites.  They were complaining about God’s provision for them.  They were not satisfied with what God was doing in their lives.  They wanted what they wanted NOW.  Like any good parent, God nipped this bad behavior in the bud.  He sent venomous snakes into their midst and people started to die.  He got their attention!  Once the Israelites were confronted with God’s discipline, they sought out Moses to speak to God.  Moses prayed to God on their behalf.  In response, He had him build a bronze snake and put it on a pole.  If they were bitten, all they had to do was look at the snake and they would live.  God made it obvious to them that HE was in control, that HE was their source, and that HE would provide for them.  They had to continuously look to Him.  God didn’t take away the snakes, but He provided a way for them to be saved.

1What causes fights and quarrels among you? Don’t they come from your desires that battle within you? You desire but do not have, so you kill. You covet but you cannot get what you want, so you quarrel and fight. You do not have because you do not ask God. When you ask, you do not receive, because you ask with wrong motives, that you may spend what you get on your pleasures.

Selfish; self-centered; entitled. Again, these words come to mind.  This time, however, it is not the Israelites who elicit these adjectives, it is me as I see them apply to myself. There are times I have prayed for something and God has not answered the prayer in the timeframe I believe He should have.  I get in a bad mood, or start complaining.  I want what I want NOW!  I thought about how lately I have found myself dissatisfied with my life.  What are you doing God?  Are you even there?  What about me?  Selfish; self-centered; entitled.

Through time spent with him, I remembered who God is. He is God, and I am not.  He owes me nothing; I owe Him everything.  Even if I never receive another answered prayer or blessing, He has already given me the greatest gift:  His Son.  If He never does another thing for me in this life, He provided a way to live with Him forever in the next.  Every day I need to remember this.  Every day I need to thank Him.  Every.  Day.  I don’t have a bronze snake on a pole to save me.  I have an empty tomb and a risen Savior.  When I get outside of my self—my needs, my wants, my wrong motives—I see that truth clearly.  I can praise God with a joyful heart and lifted hands.

Father, I know I am selfish. I know I grumble and complain.  I know I am not always satisfied with my life.  Forgive me LORD for thinking I deserve anything more than you’ve already done on my behalf.  I ask for a changed heart—one of gratitude for who you are and thankful that you love me.  I ask for a humble spirit that I might look out instead of in and up instead of down.  I ask hoping my motives are right.  I do not seek pleasure, for that is fleeting.  I seek joy.  That comes from you alone.  In Jesus name, Amen

Cindy (gardnlady)

 

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Numbers 5; Psalm 39; Song 3; Hebrews 3

Why is it we have this false belief that because we are believers, walking with Jesus, we are going to live this problem-free life? There are things that are going to come at us, shake our very foundations, and leave us dazed and confused at something we never saw coming.  One moment we are flying high.  We are serving God; all our relationships are strong and healthy; life is good.  Then, BOOM!  Everyone’s boom is different.  We get called into our boss’s office and are told the company is downsizing and we have no job.  One moment we’re laughing with our spouse and the next we’re calling 911 because they’ve fallen to the ground unresponsive.  We go to the doctor for our annual physical and he finds something suspicious in his examination.  We get a call that one of our children has been in an accident and is on the way to the hospital.  That solid ground we’ve been standing on has started shaking and we have a split second to decide how we’re going to respond.  David talked about this.

“Show me, Lord, my life’s end and the number of my days; let me know how fleeting my life is. You have made my days a mere handbreadth;  the span of my years is as nothing before you. Everyone is but a breath, even those who seem secure.[b]

“Surely everyone goes around like a mere phantom; in vain they rush about, heaping up wealth without knowing whose it will finally be.

“But now, Lord, what do I look for? My hope is in you.

We can choose to put our hope in the Lord just as David did. God alone is our firm foundation. He is our solid ground.  He is the only security we truly have.  When our world is crumbling around us there is nothing else we can cling to because there is nothing else that can’t be destroyed.

How do we do this? We get to know him, spend time with him, commune with him, and trust him.  We have to know God’s word and his character.  When I was a new believer, I struggled with trusting God.  I wasn’t even sure how to do that—how do you learn to trust?  I really sensed the Holy Spirit whisper to my heart:  Trust comes with time and consistency.  Wow!  That is exactly how you learn to trust!  When someone or something is consistent over a period of time, you learn to trust.  God is faithful.  Always.  The longer we walk with him we see that faithfulness in our own lives.  Sure, we’ve read in the bible how he’s been faithful in other people’s lives, but we get to see it in our own life.

Heb 3:12 See to it, brothers and sisters, that none of you has a sinful, unbelieving heart that turns away from the living God. 13 But encourage one another daily, as long as it is called “Today,” so that none of you may be hardened by sin’s deceitfulness.

So . . . these trials come into our lives. And maybe we don’t weather them very well.  Maybe you find yourself struggling with believing God is good.  That is exactly what Satan is waiting for.  He is just waiting for the opportunity to say to you:  “Did God really say . . .?” because he wants to deceive you and question what you thought you knew in your heart.  That doubt can take us into a pit of despair!  This is why it is so important for us to be in community with other believers who truly know us. We must allow ourselves to be transparent.  In those moments of weakness, we need them to remind us of God’s faithfulness, of his goodness, of his promises.  We need to encourage each other daily. Our voice of encouragement needs to be louder than the lies.  I love the wording in this verse, “as long as it is called “Today” because every day we wake up is today!  So there is never a day we don’t need encouragement from God, from His word, from our fellow believers and to do likewise to others.  Look around at the people God has brought into our lives.  Who needs encouragement?  I guarantee someone does.  We are talented actors, showing the world everything is okay—on the outside; but inside, we’re a mess.  If you pray and ask God to reveal someone who needs encouragement, you’d be surprised who he brings to your mind.

Our world as we know it can be changed in an instant. We will never be immune from it this side of glory.  What we need to survive is something unshakable in a world that can be so easily shaken.  Jesus is the answer.  That is where we start.  Call out to Him, ask Him to be that stability, that immovable object in your life.  Then, encourage others to do likewise.

Have you ever noticed that whenever there is a big storm brewing, the newscasters always start telling you how to be prepared ahead of time in case it hits? The wise thing to do is take heed of their advice.  Maybe the storm will hit, maybe it won’t.  Maybe you’ll have an earth shaking trial in your life, maybe you won’t.  Isn’t it better to be prepared?  You can’t lose by putting your hope in the Lord!

Lord, thank you for being immovable; trustworthy; the Person I can always count on. I can cling to you no matter what.  You are unshakeable in a world that is easily shaken.  I pray for those who are struggling even today, Father, that someone will encourage them.  They will bring your light into their dark place.  If there is someone in my life, let me help them grab on to you for dear life as we cannot survive without you.  On Christ the solid rock I stand, all other ground is sinking sand.  In His name I pray!

 Cindy (gardnlady)

 

 

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Leviticus 18; Psalm 22; Ecclesiastes 1; 1 Timothy 3

Today is a good day! It is Good Friday!

I have to admit the verses I read for today brought on an entirely different meaning to me once I realized the significance of the day they were assigned to be read. On the Christian calendar, today marks the remembrance of Good Friday—the day Jesus was crucified.  There was nothing “good” about that day as it is recognized as the darkest day in all of history.   It is the day the Jews (those who believed) lost all hope that this Man, Jesus, was the Messiah prophesized for hundreds of years.  It was not good for his disciples who had given up everything to follow him. What were they to do now?  But God’s plan of redemption was being fulfilled before the eyes of creation.  No one saw the significance as it occurred.  It proves that God’s greatest works may not “look” the way we think they should.  On that day, God made a way for us to have direct access to Him by tearing the curtain of separation.

Psalm 22 contains verses that were fulfilled in the Gospels.

My God, my God, why have you abandoned me? (see also Mark 15:33-34) NLT

Jesus says these words as he is hanging on the cross. In researching these words I came upon an interesting perspective.  I had always thought of these words as Jesus suffering separation from God (2 Cor 5:21) taking our sin upon himself.  But one commentary I read talked about Jesus pointing the people around him to Psalm 22, revealing the prophecy being fulfilled before their eyes, teaching even as he was dying.  If they read that scripture, they would have read these words that were written hundreds of years before Christ was born:

 16b They have pierced[a] my hands and feet.  (see also Matt 27:35; Mark 15:24; Acts 2:23)

 18 They divide my garments among themselves and throw dice[b] for my clothing.  (see also John 19:24)

“Everything is meaningless,” says the Teacher, “completely meaningless!”  (Ecclesiastes 1)

 Apart from Jesus Christ, this is true. Only He gives meaning to life AND death.

I shared in a recent post that it seemed death was all around me. At that time, I was waiting for my brother to die. We had been told it was imminent but I don’t think we ever want to give up hope that a miracle can happen.  It was a wait that took me deep into a pit of depression.  In my eyes, it was meaningless.  The last few years as he slowly declined and then finally the pneumonia that took him–it all made me angry.  I was angry with this horrible disease that took away the life he could have had and the time we could have spent together.  I wasn’t sure what to do with that anger, so I held it in and isolated from the world as much as I could.  I went through the motions of life but it was all meaningless.

As I’ve read through these verses the last few weeks, I began to find comfort. When I first started reading the verses, Ecclesiastes 1 really spoke to my mood.  But this past week, as Easter approached, I thought of Jesus laying down His life for us.  He was willing to die, to suffer, and to sacrifice Himself.  Death had no victory over him.  John 12:24-25 says “unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds.  Anyone who loves their life will lose it, while anyone who hates their life in this world will keep it for eternal life.”  I began to see anew that there is meaning to death.  Yes, we are separated from our loved ones but only for a while if they have believed in Christ as their Savior.  Yes, we miss them terribly and there is a void in our lives.  But death is not the end!  Jesus rose on the third day.  We are told by Jesus himself that he goes before us to prepare a place for us.  Why would he tell that to us if it were not true?

As I read through the verses in Leviticus and 1 Timothy, they are filled with laws and rules on how we are to live our lives here. Following Jesus gives our life meaning.  Living as he taught us to live gives our lives meaning.  Serving him gives our life meaning.  Getting to be with him when we die—that gives death meaning.   It is time to get busy living until he calls me to be with him.

I don’t know about anyone else, but I need Easter. He is Risen!

Father, today as we remember the price Jesus paid for us to be with You, let us not take it lightly. We need to remember he willing allowed his body to be abused and broken beyond what most of us could ever endure.  For this, we eat the bread.  We need to remember the blood he shed to atone for our sins.  For this, we drink the wine.  He died the death we deserve.  But then he rose!  Hallelujah!

Cindy (gardnlady)

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