Category Archives: 2 Corinthians

Exodus 25; John 4; Proverbs 1; 2 Corinthians 13

Place inside the Ark the stone tablets inscribed with the terms of the covenant, which I will give to you. Then put the atonement cover on top of the Ark. I will meet you there and talk to you from above the atonement cover between the gold cherubim that hover over the Ark of the Covenant. From there I will give you my commands for the people of Israel.” Exodus 25:21-22 NLT

The Ark of the Covenant was a visual sign of the Lord’s presence. How do I feel the Lord’s presence today? Do I know that He is always with me, even when I can’t sense it?

Jesus asked, “Will you never believe in me unless you see miraculous signs and wonders?” The official pleaded, “Lord, please come now before my little boy dies.” Then Jesus told him, “Go back home. Your son will live!” And the man believed what Jesus said and started home.” John 4:48-50 NLT

He promises to always be with me. Sometimes I am distracted by so many other things, that I miss His voice. Maybe God is always speaking to me, I’m just not listening. I am thankful that He pursues me and meets me where I am. If I just clear the clutter in my mind, I know he is there waiting patiently for me to return to him.

Come and listen to my counsel. I’ll share my heart with you and make you wise. “I called you so often, but you wouldn’t come. I reached out to you, but you paid no attention…But all who listen to me will live in peace, untroubled by fear of harm.” Proverbs 1:23,24&33 NLT

My stubbornness to do things on my own can get in the way of hearing him. Than I miss out on his power. I can see his hand in my life when I humble myself before him and acknowledge that I can’t do it on my own.  And as much as I don’t want to suffer, that is when I know he is  most near.  Just as I read in my You-Version devotional this morning, “But when we suffer and choose to trust Christ through the trials we face, we are filled with his power and presence, reflecting his image to those around us.” (Hope when it Hurts, Kristen Wetherell & Sarah Walton)

I will give you all the proof you want that Christ speaks through me. Christ is not weak when he deals with you; he is powerful among you. Although he was crucified in weakness, he now lives by the power of God. We, too, are weak, just as Christ was, but when we deal with you we will be alive with him and will have God’s power…Dear brothers and sisters, I close my letter with these last words: Be joyful. Grow in maturity. Encourage each other. Live in harmony and peace. Then the God of love and peace will be with you.” 2 Corinthians 13:3,4&11 NLT

Dear Father, Thank you for your word and for the promise of your presence. Help me to quiet my heart, so I can hear your voice above all others. I need you every minute of every day. Amen.

Amy(amyctanner)

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Exodus 20; Luke 23; Job 38; 2 Corinthians 8

Help me, Lord, to remember well.

Help me to remember your life-giving rain, your power over the waves, your beauty in the sunrises, your mystery in the stars. (Job 38)

Help me to remember your jealous love for me–your want of my love and your promises to love me back. (Exodus 20)

Help me to remember Christ’s humility on the cross–his submission to your will–to take on my sin and die in my place, and not just my sin, but everyone’s. That my offenses and offenses against me aren’t a burden for me to carry, and the cross is the place to lay them down. And in that is all the sadness; and in that is all the joy; and in that is all your glory. (Luke 23)

Help me to remember you know what I need. You know it before I even ask. Help me to live a generous life in time, talent or treasure–oh, but especially in eager love. (2 Corinthians 8)

Sometimes my focus is on what I have to do today, tomorrow, next week. Sometimes my focus in on past hurts that cut deeply, the memories cut fresh and I wonder if they can ever heal. Sometimes my focus is of loss or overwhelm or wondering why–answers beyond my reach and understanding.

Father God, thank you for loving me as you do. I am looking for you everywhere today. I want you to be my focus. I’m trusting you for healing and peace. I’m trusting you for strength and guidance. Thank you, God, for your word in my hands and in my heart.

Courtney (66books365)

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Exodus 19; Luke 22; Job 37; 2 Corinthians 7

Exodus 19:3,4 And Moses went up to God, and the Lord called to him from the mountain, saying, “Thus you shall say to the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel: ‘You have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to Myself.’”

Commentary from The Chumash, “When Moses spoke to the House of Jacob which refers to the women, he was to express the commandments in a manner suited to their compassionate, maternal nature.”

God has Moses speak to women in a manner suited to their compassionate nature. That is how God speaks to me. He reminds me that He brought me to Him, and He does this with great love and tenderness, so much so that I surrender willingly to His voice.

Luke 22:10-12 And He (Jesus) said to them, “Behold, when you have entered the city, a man will meet you carrying a pitcher of water; follow him into the house which he enters. Then you shall say to the master of the house, ‘The Teacher says to you, “Where is the guest room where I may eat the Passover with My disciples?”’ Then he will show you a large, furnished upper room; there make ready.”

Commentary: Guest rooms were often made available to the thousands of pilgrims who came to Jerusalem for the celebration of Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread.

Many times I walked into places or situations ordained by God. He prepared these before I knew to ask or to seek. Yet, how often I am surprised and definitely humbled by my own helplessness to control the outcome.

Job 37:14, 19, 20 Listen to this, O Job; Stand still and consider the wondrous works of God. Teach us what we should say to Him, For we can prepare nothing because of the darkness.

Commentary: Elihu celebrates God’s control over the earth and he prepares Job, Job’s friends, and any bystanders for the coming of the Lord.

When embroiled in the turmoil of my afflictions and pain, no one but God can reach me. Yet true friends and family who are closest know how to soften my resistance in my confusion, to direct my gaze toward Him and to prepare my heart to receive Him.

2 Corinthians 7:6 Nevertheless God, who comforts the downcast, comforted us by the coming of Titus, and not only by his coming, but also by the consolation with which he was comforted in you, when he told us of your earnest desire, your mourning, your zeal for me, so that I rejoiced even more.

And into the darkness explodes brilliance, comfort, consolation, and reason to rejoice. Unexpected, such as the coming of a friend from across the country after eight years with little hope of ever being close enough for her warm embrace and sisterly love. How wonderful God is to us; He meets us where we are, no matter what shape He finds us. Right here, right now!

Oh, come Lord Jesus and have Your way with us that we might know You more and fall in love with You over and over again!

Janet (jansuwilkinson)

The Chamush. The ArtScroll Series/Stone Edition. 2000.

The Nelson Study Bible, New King James Version, Trinity Fellowship Church 25th Anniversary Commemorative Edition, 2002.

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Exodus 15, Luke 18, Job 23, 2Cor 3

Your very lives are a letter that anyone can read by just looking at you.

2 Corinthinans 3: 3 The Message

Paul’s statement to the Corinthians got me thinking about what kind of letter my life represents. As a believer in Christ, my desire is that my life would be a loving invitation to the world to join in on the journey, a testimony that this beautiful mess is the place to be. Sadly, I think my life is probably more often like a letter of complaint, or a rejection letter that says, “I got this, I don’t need Christ today.”

We see the Israelites in Exodus 15, on the other side of the Red Sea, proclaiming victory. They had just been spared their life through a miraculous event!

I’m singing my heart out to God—what a victory!
    He pitched horse and rider into the sea.
God is my strength, God is my song,
    and, yes! God is my salvation.
This is the kind of God I have
    and I’m telling the world!

Exodus 15:1-3 The Message

I can’t even imagine the relief and joy they must have been feeling. To have seen the enemy so close, chasing them down, only to be swallowed up by the sea. I can picture them face down on the ground, praising God for his deliverance. Yet….only 3 days later, when they struggle to find water, they grumble. How could they have forgotten so quickly? Yet, I often do the same. What kind of letter am I sending??  Am I declaring with my life that God is in the glaring victories, as well as, in the struggles?

Jesus uses the parable of the rich official to demonstrate how hard it is for the wealthy to let go of material things. The rich official is feeling pretty good about all he has sacrificed but when Jesus tells him to sell all his belongings, he is crest-fallen.

23 This was the last thing the official expected to hear. He was very rich and became terribly sad. He was holding on tight to a lot of things and not about to let them go.

Luke 18:23 The Message

I have been fortunate enough to travel to quite a few places in the world. I have seen poverty up close. Like nothing we see on a daily basis in the United States. I understand how rich we truly are. Yet, even in that understanding, my hands are clinging too tightly to “things.” Recently, I have heard a worship leader ask, “how can we recieve from God when our hands are closed?” How true! How humbling! What kind of letter am I sending? One of that invites freedom or one declares fear?

We find Job in Chapter 23 wondering where God is. He seems nowhere to be found. Yet, even still, Job has a proper view of who God is.

But he is singular and sovereign. Who can argue with him?
    He does what he wants, when he wants to.
He’ll complete in detail what he’s decided about me,
    and whatever else he determines to do.

Job 23:13-14

Accepting God’s sovereignty and trusting in his decisions is something I want in my life. Rather than questioning and struggling with my circumstances. Who am I to question the Maker of the Universe?

Lord, help me be a letter that invites people to draw closer to you, that declares your goodness. Help me to trust in who you are and not grumble in my circumstances. Help me cling to Jesus as I walk through the life you have given me so that you will be glorified. 

Ann (naturelady)

 

 

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Zephaniah; Psalm 74; II Corinthians 8

One of the most frequent arguments of man about God goes something like this, “If God rules over the day, the night, the light, and the sun; if He sets seasons and limits the oceans from covering all the land, how is it that He allows chaos and destruction in the world?” (Paraphrased, Psalm 74). A more personal, contemporary grudge with God begets questions like, “If God is a loving, caring God, then why did He allow this addiction, divorce, death of my loved one, bankruptcy, job loss, declined health… in my life?” Throughout history man has cried out to God, yet, I sense a subtle change in the way New Testament Christians are called to perceive the difficulties of life. I am reminded of Courtney’s September 22nd post quoting II Corinthians 6:3-5:

3We try to live in such a way that no one will ever be offended or kept back from finding the Lord by the way we act, so that no one can find fault with us and blame it on the Lord. 4 In fact, in everything we do we try to show that we are true ministers of God. We patiently endure suffering and hardship and trouble of every kind. 5 We have been beaten, put in jail, faced angry mobs, worked to exhaustion, stayed awake through sleepless nights of watching, and gone without food. 6 We have proved ourselves to be what we claim by our wholesome lives and by our understanding of the Gospel and by our patience. We have been kind and truly loving and filled with the Holy Spirit.

Do you see the shift? It isn’t as though we are to stop asking God to intervene. There are too many Scriptures that challenge or command us to pray for self and others. The wild, uncontrollable impulse to question God’s goodness, His intentions, and His desire to deliver His “turtledove” from destruction is the difference I see in Paul’s discourse. There need be no doubt in an anno Domini son’s or daughter’s heart that God’s will is being accomplished in the lives of His children.

This is not to say that the children of Israel before Christ were not chastised for unbelief. Zephaniah warns that God will “…punish men who are settled in complacency, who say in their heart, ‘The Lord will not do good, nor will He do evil,” (v 12). Only the foolish believed that God was uninvolved with His people and inactive.

Yet, today many still question God’s interaction with man. (Of course, I am not talking about nonbelievers who use this same argument to try discrediting God.) Focusing on the inequality in the world leads many to think that God neither blesses nor curses, and neither comes to the aid of or punishes His own. But do our circumstances evidence God’s apathy, or does complacency expose hearts fallen prey to life’s circumstances?

Maybe I just want an end to the questions. Then I remember that Jesus Christ put to rest all arguments when on the cross, He said, “It is finished!” What a relief! Like the Apostle Paul’s advice to the Corinthians, we must push on in our Christian walk, “doing what you began and were desiring to do a year ago;” [a month ago, a decade ago] (my words); but now you also must complete the doing of it; that is there was a readiness to desire it, so there also may be a completion of what you have.” Whether in giving good gifts to the saints as is intended in this Scripture or in living a sacrificial life, I pray,

Dear Lord Jesus, help us to walk in victory over our circumstances. Help us demonstrate our belief in the personal intervention of a risen Savior who proved unequivocally that God is involved in our lives. Help us to focus on becoming “kind and truly loving and filled with the Holy Spirit” so that others will see You in us. Thank You for hearts dependent on the grace and mercy You daily bestow!

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Habakkuk 2; 2 Corinthians 7

WE…the overwhelming pronoun used in 2 Corinthians is not “I”, it is “we.” 2 Corinthians is a letter written by a man who is in love with God and his community of fellow believers. This kind of love must have been a shock to the world. It’s the kind of love that one might expect from a close-knit family, but not from people who are unrelated. It would be reasonable to expect that the early Church would turn on each other and disband in the face of opposition and persecution.

Do I share this fierce love for my fellow believers or am I quick to pull away when things get difficult and avoid conflict? Paul leans in:

“Even if I caused you sorrow by my letter… yet now I am happy, not because you were made sorry, but because your sorrow led you to repentance.”  2 Corinthians 7:8-9

Somethings are simply worth fighting for. Human conflict is risky, but truth wins. Paul modeled what he described in his previous letter to the church at Corinth:

“Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails.”  1 Corinthians 13:4-8.

This is the very love God showers down on me everyday through the work of his son, Jesus. It’s more real than the breath in my lungs and the beat of my heart.

Holy Spirit, teach me to love like you do. Help me to lean in towards others and not pull away when difficulties arise. Help me to receive the truth as well as speak the truth in love. Give me a heart that is humble and willing to risk not being understood or loved in return. And relieve me of my  crazy need to be right. May your truth win in all my relationships. Amen

“For the earth will be filled with the knowledge of your the glory of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea.” Habakkuk 2:14

Klueh

 

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