Category Archives: Ruth

Ruth 3,4; Acts 28; Jeremiah 38; Psalms 11,12

I’m finishing up listening to an audio version of a book called 5 Habits of a Woman Who Doesn’t Quit by Nicki Koziarz (not paid or otherwise compensated to mention this book). A friend recommended it at large, and I tucked it away for someday. While I’m not sure how the title came back into my sight line, I can say that several times this year, there have been things I wanted to quit (and things I didn’t want to quit but thought I might have to because this pace is wearing me too thin). I decided to give the book a listening to. In it, Koziarz discusses Ruth.

Today, in Ruth 3 and 4, I read the conclusion of (Ruth’s) story, where her kinsman redeemer marries her, joy is restored, and she is part of royal lineage–and all because she made the choice not to quit. She exhibits strength, loyalty, faith, perseverance, patience, and trust.

And what doesn’t Paul go through in Acts? In this chapter, he’s warming himself by a fire after a shipwreck. He’s bitten by a poisonous snake and survives. After months, he continues on his journey to Rome.

30 For the next two years, Paul lived in Rome at his own expense. He welcomed all who visited him, 31 boldly proclaiming the Kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ. And no one tried to stop him. (Acts 28:30-31, NLT)

He persevered too, and not in a roll-with-the-punches sort of way: he boldly proclaimed the Kingdom of God and taught about the Lord. He was resilient and focused.

Jeremiah’s unpopular message made him a traitor to be lowered into a cistern and left for dead. But that wasn’t where his story stopped. Though he couldn’t climb out in his own strength, he was raised out of the cistern because of the petitions of an important court official. Jeremiah’s message didn’t change–surrender or else. A tough job.

15 Jeremiah said, “If I tell you the truth, you will kill me. And if I give you advice, you won’t listen to me anyway.” (Jeremiah 38:15, NLT)

He didn’t quit.

In the psalms, encouragement still (emphasis mine). Don’t quit.

I trust in the Lord for protection.
So why do you say to me,
    “Fly like a bird to the mountains for safety!

But the Lord is in his holy Temple;
    the Lord still rules from heaven.
He watches everyone closely,
    examining every person on earth.
The Lord examines both the righteous and the wicked. (Psalm 11:1, 4-5, NLT)

And

The Lord’s promises are pure,
    like silver refined in a furnace,
    purified seven times over.
Therefore, Lord, we know you will protect the oppressed,
    preserving them forever from this lying generation,
even though the wicked strut about,
    and evil is praised throughout the land. (Psalm 12:6-8, NLT)

Maybe one day the things I’m going through won’t seem so big-hairy-scary-heavy. Maybe one day I’ll look back and laugh at what I thought was difficult. In real time, the things are big and heavy and difficult. And yesterday, I was looking to quit.

Thank you, Lord, for all that you are teaching me about who you are and what you can do. Thank you for showing me that character is developed through trials, and perseverance is built one day at a time. Help me to keep my eyes fixed on you.

Courtney (66books365)

 

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Filed under 66 Books, Bible in a year reading plan, M'Cheyne Bible reading plan, Old Testament, Psalms, Ruth, Uncategorized

Ruth 1; Acts 26; Jer. 36, 45; Ps. 9

Aspiring to a higher standard isn’t always easy…

Things are far more bitter for me than for you.” Ruth 1:13

As I continue to read through the Bible, the common theme in many of the stories is the amazingly strong faith that is portrayed. When I read this chapter in Ruth, it reminded me of the story of Horatio Spafford, who, in the midst of dealing with unimaginable tragedy at the loss of all his children, one to pneumonia, and four to an accident at sea, he penned the words to the song ‘It is Well with My Soul.’ Spafford demonstrated in action his amazing faith in God, that we are to trust that He is in control.

In this first chapter of Ruth, it is intriguing to note that the book begins as Naomi’s story, with Ruth’s mother-in-law as the main character. Naomi was faced with losing her husband and two sons, leaving her a widow with no support, typically resulting in financial ruin. As readers, we’re left with trying to imagine the pain she must have been experiencing and the bleak future before her.

As humans, we don’t like pain… directly, as in when we, ourselves, are going through something difficult, or indirectly, when we witness others experiencing pain. The pain we experience directly, however, isn’t typically a personal choice, but indirect pain typically has choice attached to it. Is our decision not to engage in someone else’s hurt because it will ruin our otherwise pain-free life at the time? Or is it based on fear, that if we engage with those who are dealing directly with pain, we’ll get pulled into something we don’t have the ability to tactfully back away from if the circumstances get to be too much?

Ruth, however, modeled for us a different approach to struggle… a path based on a higher standard.  Instead of shying away from Naomi’s sorrow, she aligned herself with it, all while dealing with her own grief of widowhood. She chose the way of pain out of loyalty for her husband’s mother, picking a difficult future for herself because her life was about more than herself. She understood and practiced what it means to live for others.

I would suspect that for most of us, it is difficult to comprehend the sacrifices Ruth made. Imagine a similar situation happening today… knowing that someone experienced a significant loss, air travel has made it possible to get on a plane and travel to just about any location worldwide. Our finances aren’t limited by gender or marital status as they once were during the time of the Old Testament. Ruth really did give up everything to help Naomi, and God blessed her with a second family and the honor of being an ancestor of Jesus.

Today will bring choices of whether to care deeply for others going through hard times. Are we willing to invest ourselves in someone else’s pain? Consider the rewards God has in store for those who make the sacrifices of loyalty and love.

Heavenly Father… sometimes showing loyalty seems costly, especially when it requires taking on someone else’s pain and feeling that pain as if it were mine. But, Father, Your way isn’t always easy… help me to choose right over easy, even though the reasons may not be clear at the time. Amen!

Greg (gstefanelli)

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Filed under 66 Books, Bible in a year reading plan, M'Cheyne Bible reading plan, Old Testament, Ruth