Category Archives: Ruth

Ruth 3-4; Psalm 37; Acts 4

Then Peter, filled with the Holy Spirit, said to them: “Rulers and elders of the people! If we are being called to account today for an act of kindness shown to a man who was lame and are being asked how he was healed, 10 then know this, you and all the people of Israel: It is by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified but whom God raised from the dead, that this man stands before you healed. 11 Jesus is

“‘the stone you builders rejected,  which has become the cornerstone.’

12 Salvation is found in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given to mankind by which we must be saved.”

13 When they saw the courage of Peter and John and realized that they were unschooled, ordinary men, they were astonished and they took note that these men had been with Jesus. 14 But since they could see the man who had been healed standing there with them, there was nothing they could say. 15 So they ordered them to withdraw from the Sanhedrin and then conferred together. 16 “What are we going to do with these men?” they asked. “Everyone living in Jerusalem knows they have performed a notable sign, and we cannot deny it. 17 But to stop this thing from spreading any further among the people, we must warn them to speak no longer to anyone in this name.”

18 Then they called them in again and commanded them not to speak or teach at all in the name of Jesus. 19 But Peter and John replied, “Which is right in God’s eyes: to listen to you, or to him? You be the judges! 20 As for us, we cannot help speaking about what we have seen and heard.”

21 After further threats they let them go. They could not decide how to punish them, because all the people were praising God for what had happened. 22 For the man who was miraculously healed was over forty years old. (NIV)

20 As for us, we cannot help speaking about what we have seen and heard.” This is a statement of a changed life, a man who finally got what Jesus had been teaching his disciples. It had not been that long ago that Peter had denied he knew Jesus out of fear for his own life, yet here he was, standing in front of authorities, and not backing down. That was one of the things I remember learning when I first became a follower. Through all the years after his death and resurrection, not one of the men who had witnessed it ever changed their story. No matter how they were threatened with death, or beaten, or thrown into jail, their story of what they witnessed stayed the same.

We all have a story of how following Jesus changed our lives. One of my favorite Sundays at our church is Baptism Sunday. People share their testimony of lives completely turned around because they believed and let Jesus into their hearts. There is so much joy, and singing, and clapping “because all the people were praising God for what had happened.” I think it takes a changed life to recognize that change in someone else. The look of joy when they step out in faith and proclaim they want a new life just brings tears to my eyes. I get to relive my own excitement of that decision with them.

What I love even more are the people who spontaneously decide to be baptized because of the stories of restoration they have heard. Something in them stirs and they can’t contain themselves. The Holy Spirit is working in them–the same Holy Spirit that evoked Peter to boldly proclaim “12 Salvation is found in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given to mankind by which we must be saved.”

The bible gives us countless stories of God’s restoration. The Book of Ruth is one of those.

13 So Boaz took Ruth into his home, and she became his wife. When he slept with her, the Lord enabled her to become pregnant, and she gave birth to a son. 14 Then the women of the town said to Naomi, “Praise the Lord, who has now provided a redeemer for your family! May this child be famous in Israel. 15 May he restore your youth and care for you in your old age. For he is the son of your daughter-in-law who loves you and has been better to you than seven sons!”

16 Naomi took the baby and cuddled him to her breast. And she cared for him as if he were her own. 17 The neighbor women said, “Now at last Naomi has a son again!” And they named him Obed. He became the father of Jesse and the grandfather of David. (NLT)

I never tire of reading that book of the bible. God’s plan of redemption for our lives is such a major theme. Through it he not only restored the lives of Naomi and Ruth, he also put into place the plan of redemption for all of humanity. Through David’s genealogy came Jesus, who is our Savior.

Heavenly Father, my life was changed the moment I believed. You have always had a plan for my life—that knowledge has brought healing to my troubled soul. May I continue to praise you and lift my voice with all the saints throughout eternity proclaiming the name of Jesus, the greatest name of all. In His name I pray. Amen

Cindy (gardnlady)

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Ruth 1,2; Acts 3

Do you believe in coincidences? Many times in our lives what look like chance encounters end up being life-changing events. There’s an interesting movie entitled, “Sliding Doors”. It has to do with two alternative outcomes depending on whether a woman gets on a train or has to wait for the next one. This simple choice — and the movie plays out both options — shows what happens by just that one tiny choice.

Ruth 2 has an interesting “throw away” line, “3 So she set out and went and gleaned in the field after the reapers, and she happened to come to the part of the field belonging to Boaz, who was of the clan of Elimelech.” The author of this short book treats this chance encounter as a coincidence. Yet, it starts of a chain of events that results in the unbroken lineage in the ancestry of Jesus. What seemed like a chance decision or happenstance ended up being one of the most important events in human history.

Have you had something like this happen in your life? I can see in mine events that seemed unrelated being life-changing and subsequently life changing for millions of people. Not because of my choices, but because of what God has done in the circumstances of my life. Look back over the history of your life. Can you find at least one of these sliding door moments that has changed your path or those of others that has made an eternal difference in God’s kingdom?

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Ruth 3,4; Acts 28; Jeremiah 38; Psalms 11,12

I’m finishing up listening to an audio version of a book called 5 Habits of a Woman Who Doesn’t Quit by Nicki Koziarz (not paid or otherwise compensated to mention this book). A friend recommended it at large, and I tucked it away for someday. While I’m not sure how the title came back into my sight line, I can say that several times this year, there have been things I wanted to quit (and things I didn’t want to quit but thought I might have to because this pace is wearing me too thin). I decided to give the book a listening to. In it, Koziarz discusses Ruth.

Today, in Ruth 3 and 4, I read the conclusion of (Ruth’s) story, where her kinsman redeemer marries her, joy is restored, and she is part of royal lineage–and all because she made the choice not to quit. She exhibits strength, loyalty, faith, perseverance, patience, and trust.

And what doesn’t Paul go through in Acts? In this chapter, he’s warming himself by a fire after a shipwreck. He’s bitten by a poisonous snake and survives. After months, he continues on his journey to Rome.

30 For the next two years, Paul lived in Rome at his own expense. He welcomed all who visited him, 31 boldly proclaiming the Kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ. And no one tried to stop him. (Acts 28:30-31, NLT)

He persevered too, and not in a roll-with-the-punches sort of way: he boldly proclaimed the Kingdom of God and taught about the Lord. He was resilient and focused.

Jeremiah’s unpopular message made him a traitor to be lowered into a cistern and left for dead. But that wasn’t where his story stopped. Though he couldn’t climb out in his own strength, he was raised out of the cistern because of the petitions of an important court official. Jeremiah’s message didn’t change–surrender or else. A tough job.

15 Jeremiah said, “If I tell you the truth, you will kill me. And if I give you advice, you won’t listen to me anyway.” (Jeremiah 38:15, NLT)

He didn’t quit.

In the psalms, encouragement still (emphasis mine). Don’t quit.

I trust in the Lord for protection.
So why do you say to me,
    “Fly like a bird to the mountains for safety!

But the Lord is in his holy Temple;
    the Lord still rules from heaven.
He watches everyone closely,
    examining every person on earth.
The Lord examines both the righteous and the wicked. (Psalm 11:1, 4-5, NLT)

And

The Lord’s promises are pure,
    like silver refined in a furnace,
    purified seven times over.
Therefore, Lord, we know you will protect the oppressed,
    preserving them forever from this lying generation,
even though the wicked strut about,
    and evil is praised throughout the land. (Psalm 12:6-8, NLT)

Maybe one day the things I’m going through won’t seem so big-hairy-scary-heavy. Maybe one day I’ll look back and laugh at what I thought was difficult. In real time, the things are big and heavy and difficult. And yesterday, I was looking to quit.

Thank you, Lord, for all that you are teaching me about who you are and what you can do. Thank you for showing me that character is developed through trials, and perseverance is built one day at a time. Help me to keep my eyes fixed on you.

Courtney (66books365)

 

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Ruth 1; Acts 26; Jer. 36, 45; Ps. 9

Aspiring to a higher standard isn’t always easy…

Things are far more bitter for me than for you.” Ruth 1:13

As I continue to read through the Bible, the common theme in many of the stories is the amazingly strong faith that is portrayed. When I read this chapter in Ruth, it reminded me of the story of Horatio Spafford, who, in the midst of dealing with unimaginable tragedy at the loss of all his children, one to pneumonia, and four to an accident at sea, he penned the words to the song ‘It is Well with My Soul.’ Spafford demonstrated in action his amazing faith in God, that we are to trust that He is in control.

In this first chapter of Ruth, it is intriguing to note that the book begins as Naomi’s story, with Ruth’s mother-in-law as the main character. Naomi was faced with losing her husband and two sons, leaving her a widow with no support, typically resulting in financial ruin. As readers, we’re left with trying to imagine the pain she must have been experiencing and the bleak future before her.

As humans, we don’t like pain… directly, as in when we, ourselves, are going through something difficult, or indirectly, when we witness others experiencing pain. The pain we experience directly, however, isn’t typically a personal choice, but indirect pain typically has choice attached to it. Is our decision not to engage in someone else’s hurt because it will ruin our otherwise pain-free life at the time? Or is it based on fear, that if we engage with those who are dealing directly with pain, we’ll get pulled into something we don’t have the ability to tactfully back away from if the circumstances get to be too much?

Ruth, however, modeled for us a different approach to struggle… a path based on a higher standard.  Instead of shying away from Naomi’s sorrow, she aligned herself with it, all while dealing with her own grief of widowhood. She chose the way of pain out of loyalty for her husband’s mother, picking a difficult future for herself because her life was about more than herself. She understood and practiced what it means to live for others.

I would suspect that for most of us, it is difficult to comprehend the sacrifices Ruth made. Imagine a similar situation happening today… knowing that someone experienced a significant loss, air travel has made it possible to get on a plane and travel to just about any location worldwide. Our finances aren’t limited by gender or marital status as they once were during the time of the Old Testament. Ruth really did give up everything to help Naomi, and God blessed her with a second family and the honor of being an ancestor of Jesus.

Today will bring choices of whether to care deeply for others going through hard times. Are we willing to invest ourselves in someone else’s pain? Consider the rewards God has in store for those who make the sacrifices of loyalty and love.

Heavenly Father… sometimes showing loyalty seems costly, especially when it requires taking on someone else’s pain and feeling that pain as if it were mine. But, Father, Your way isn’t always easy… help me to choose right over easy, even though the reasons may not be clear at the time. Amen!

Greg (gstefanelli)

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Filed under 66 Books, Bible in a year reading plan, M'Cheyne Bible reading plan, Old Testament, Ruth