Tag Archives: child of God

Job 42:10-17; Psalms 1:1-5:7

These passages pulse with life. I notice the line separating before from after. It is a significant mark. Life before the trial. Life after. My own life is marked by before-and-after events, so I pay special attention to Job’s story.

10 After Job had prayed for his friends, the Lord restored his fortunes and gave him twice as much as he had before. 11 All his brothers and sisters and everyone who had known him before came and ate with him in his house. They comforted and consoled him over all the trouble the Lord had brought on him, and each one gave him a piece of silver and a gold ring.

12 The Lord blessed the latter part of Job’s life more than the former part. He had fourteen thousand sheep, six thousand camels, a thousand yoke of oxen and a thousand donkeys. 13 And he also had seven sons and three daughters. 14 The first daughter he named Jemimah, the second Keziah and the third Keren-Happuch. 15 Nowhere in all the land were there found women as beautiful as Job’s daughters, and their father granted them an inheritance along with their brothers.

16 After this, Job lived a hundred and forty years; he saw his children and their children to the fourth generation. 17 And so Job died, an old man and full of years. (Job 42:10-17, NIV, emphasis mine)

This story has a sort of happy ending, but I always wondered if the restoration ever made the loss go away–especially when it came to Job losing his (before) children. In life after, he has ten more children. I take special note that his daughters’ names are mentioned specifically. In addition, they are seen as beautiful. And even more than that, they were given an inheritance along with their brothers. They were treasured and honored. While the Bible doesn’t speak of this directly, as I read this paragraph, I notice life post-loss with a new appreciation. Post-loss, life and all the things that can be taken away reveal their value. And it’s not to say these things/people weren’t valued before, but that in light of loss, moments in the after seem more precious. Maybe that’s why Job’s daughters’ names were mentioned, and that they were so beautiful, and that he made sure to leave something for each of them as well–because he had a new appreciation for life and its abundance.

Lord, I am so grateful you know my name. I’m so grateful that you love me. This reading is a gift to me.

Courtney (66books365)

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Numbers 1:42-3:32

There’s a lot of order, the way God has the families placed, their duties, and when they are to set out.

34 So the Israelites did everything the Lord commanded Moses; that is the way they encamped under their standards, and that is the way they set out, each of them with their clan and family. (Numbers 2:34, NIV)

One year for my birthday, I got a genetic test to find out about my health odds. I don’t know a lot about my relatives from previous generations, and I wondered what I was predisposed to. Honestly, I don’t hold much confidence in the test, because it got some things wrong (about hairline, cilantro preference, and other anecdotal things). But what I did find curious was where it suggested my family originated.

I remember wondering, “Why would you leave such a beautiful area?” What were they running to? What were they running from? When did they get here?

Scriptures like today’s reading have me think about God’s plan. His purpose for a family or an individual. From where they live, to what they do and when they go.

Father God, I’m really looking forward to the day when I will see how all the pieces, places and events fit together in your perfect plan. But while I wait, help me to keep a kingdom focus, to be where you want me to be, doing what you want me to do, with courage, strength, and love.

Courtney (66books365)

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Deuteronomy 4-5; Luke 6

For my relationship with him; for the stewardship of my own body and heart; for my relationship with others–his commands are meant for good.

29 Oh, that they would always have hearts like this, that they might fear me and obey all my commands! If they did, they and their descendants would prosper forever. (Deuteronomy 5:29, NLT)

When Jesus walked this world, some observed with suspicion, outrage, hate. Others saw hope.

18 They had come to hear him and to be healed of their diseases; and those troubled by evil spirits were healed. 19 Everyone tried to touch him, because healing power went out from him, and he healed everyone. (Luke 6:18-19, NLT)

In Luke 6, I read the beatitudes, the sorrows foretold, love for enemies, judgment, fruitfulness, building on a solid foundation. These words are meant for good–for my relationship with others; for the stewardship of my own body and heart; for my relationship with him.

Everyone tried to touch him, because healing power went out from him. Wouldn’t my arms reach for him too? And I have these words he said, here in front of me. As I read them, he is telling me so plainly how to live. How to love. How to serve.

46 “So why do you keep calling me ‘Lord, Lord!’ when you don’t do what I say? 47 I will show you what it’s like when someone comes to me, listens to my teaching, and then follows it. 48 It is like a person building a house who digs deep and lays the foundation on solid rock. When the floodwaters rise and break against that house, it stands firm because it is well built. 49 But anyone who hears and doesn’t obey is like a person who builds a house right on the ground, without a foundation. When the floods sweep down against that house, it will collapse into a heap of ruins.” (Luke 6:46-49, NLT)

When opinions, attitudes, pressures, and personalities clash, Lord, help me to see past the immediate to the eternal. You give me counsel for my good and your glory. Help me to keep perspective. Help me to remember. Help me to obey. I am so grateful for this time with you.

Courtney (66books365)

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Genesis 49-50; Galatians 4

Dear God,

Thank you for freedom. Thank you for knowing me, loving me, calling me your own–a daughter, your child. Thank you for fighting for me, dying for me, delighting in me, singing over me. You give me what no one can ever take away. Today, I celebrate.

But when the right time came, God sent his Son, born of a woman, subject to the law. God sent him to buy freedom for us who were slaves to the law, so that he could adopt us as his very own children. And because we are his children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, prompting us to call out, “Abba, Father.” Now you are no longer a slave but God’s own child. And since you are his child, God has made you his heir. (Galatians 4:4-7, NLT)

Today, I celebrate freedom.

Before you Gentiles knew God, you were slaves to so-called gods that do not even exist. So now that you know God (or should I say, now that God knows you), why do you want to go back again and become slaves once more to the weak and useless spiritual principles of this world? 10 You are trying to earn favor with God by observing certain days or months or seasons or years. 11 I fear for you. Perhaps all my hard work with you was for nothing. 12 Dear brothers and sisters, I plead with you to live as I do in freedom from these things, for I have become like you Gentiles—free from those laws. (Galatians 4:8-12, NLT)

Freedom.

28 These are the twelve tribes of Israel, and this is what their father said as he told his sons good-bye. He blessed each one with an appropriate message. (Genesis 49:28, NLT, Jacob’s last words to his sons)

I filled in the blank of the goal planner when asked my definition of success: being true to who God made me to be, living (it out) unapologetically and free.

Father God, you know my heart and you bless me deeply. Thank you for giving me the only blessing that matters–yours.

Courtney (66books365)

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1 Samuel 12; Romans 10; Jeremiah 49; Psalms 26,27

Unless I’m researching a specific topic, my favorite stop at the library is its new inventory section. This is the spot that piques my interest to reach for books I’d probably never consider (or even know of their existence). A recent loaner on gluten-free pizza was a delightful meal changer for us this summer. And a title in tobacco- and white-colored letters peeking off a black spine changed my heart for good: Not Forsaken by Louie Giglio. I checked it out without even perusing the description.

22 “The Lord will not abandon his people, because that would dishonor his great name. For it has pleased the Lord to make you his very own people.” (1 Samuel 12:22, NLT)

Turns out, Not Forsaken is about God and why he’s the perfect father. And in only the way God can, he puts this book in my hands at the right time to tell me how much he loves me, and how valued I am as a daughter–his daughter. Chosen. Dearly loved. Not forsaken.

“The six hours in the span of history when Jesus hung on the cross say more about you than all the rest of the hours in history put together. And without a doubt, the cross says God so loves you.” (Giglio, 131)

Not abandoned.

My heart has heard you say, “Come and talk with me.”
    And my heart responds, “Lord, I am coming.”
Do not turn your back on me.
    Do not reject your servant in anger.
    You have always been my helper.
Don’t leave me now; don’t abandon me,
    O God of my salvation!
10 Even if my father and mother abandon me,
    the Lord will hold me close.

11 Teach me how to live, O Lord.
    Lead me along the right path,
    for my enemies are waiting for me.
12 Do not let me fall into their hands.
    For they accuse me of things I’ve never done;
    with every breath they threaten me with violence.
13 Yet I am confident I will see the Lord’s goodness
    while I am here in the land of the living.

14 Wait patiently for the Lord.
    Be brave and courageous.
    Yes, wait patiently for the Lord. (Psalm 27:8-14, NLT)

For every lie an enemy speaks over my life, the Lord slays it with his truththe truth.

For I am always aware of your unfailing love,
    and I have lived according to your truth.
I do not spend time with liars
    or go along with hypocrites.
I hate the gatherings of those who do evil,
    and I refuse to join in with the wicked.
I wash my hands to declare my innocence.
    I come to your altar, O Lord,
singing a song of thanksgiving
    and telling of all your wonders.
I love your sanctuary, Lord,
    the place where your glorious presence dwells. (Psalm 26:3-8, NLT)

You loved me first, Lord, and I love you back.

Courtney (66books365)

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Filed under 1 Samuel, 66 Books, Bible in a year reading plan, M'Cheyne Bible reading plan, Psalms