Tag Archives: spiritual blindness

Esther 7-10; Revelation 3

John writes to seasoned believers. They have withstood persecution and hardship. They chose to follow Christ when it was the most difficult and now Jesus has words of correction for them. Note to self: who I was yesterday is of little value. It is who I am today, at this moment in time that Jesus is concerned with.

And Jesus sees all and knows all. There is nothing that can be hidden from the eye of God. The only person I may be fooling is myself. Jesus sees me right where I am and does not want me to stay stuck:

“But you do not realize that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked. I counsel you to buy from me gold refined in the fire, so you can become rich; and white clothes to wear, so you can cover your shameful nakedness; and salve to put on your eyes, so you can see.” Revelation 3:17-18.

Repentance is a life long theme. Jesus is not content to leave me alone in my ignorance and poverty of spirit. He desires so much more for his beloved:

“Those whom I love I rebuke and discipline. So be earnest, and repent. Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice end opens the door, I will come in and eat with him , and he with me.”  Revelation 3:19-20

Lord, thank you that you never fail to see me as I am. You desire only the best for me and don’t leave me ignorant and bound by my own sin. Thank you that your goodness and mercy heal the dark places I tried to hide from myself.  Amen.

Klueh

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Numbers 24, 25, 26, 27; Mark 8:11-38

And they began discussing with one another the fact that they had no bread. And Jesus, aware of this, said to them, “Why are you discussing the fact that you have no bread? Do you not yet perceive or understand? Are your hearts hardened? Having eyes do you not see, and having ears do you not hear? And do you not remember? When I broke the five loaves for the five thousand, how many baskets full of broken pieces did you take up?” They said to him, “Twelve.” “And the seven for the four thousand, how many baskets full of broken pieces did you take up?” And they said to him, “Seven.” And he said to them, “Do you not yet understand?” Mark 8:16-21

I can see in the natural, even if I do need glasses; but sometimes I don’t always see everything there is to be seen in the spiritual world. I don’t always understand the parables that Jesus spoke to the ancient world (without reading His explanations) and I don’t always appreciate the stories that He speaks into my own life. I don’t always comprehend what He is trying to do in me, what He is trying to teach me. I don’t always perceive His purposes, His heart. I don’t always grasp His goodness, His faithfulness. I don’t always see HIM.

There are times when I am so lost in the temporal, that I lose sight of His glory. I am so distracted by the never-ending needs of my kids, so preoccupied with the demands of work/ministry goals, of keeping the house clean or by getting meals on the table, that I forget the amazing ways that God has moved in my life, even before I was truly a believer. I overlook the miracles He has done through me and the miracles He has done for me. My spiritual-sight is sometimes unfocused. And in those moments, I don’t recognize Jesus in the little things; I cannot see Him clearly through the haze.

And Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi. And on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” And they told him, “John the Baptist; and others say, Elijah; and others, one of the prophets.” And he asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Christ.” Mark 8:27-29

Countless foretellings concerning Jesus were made over the generations before His birth; prophecies meant to help the people be ready for the coming King when He made His entrance. Even the diviner Balaam’s eyes were opened for a fleeting instant by the Spirit of God coming upon him and he “saw” Jesus (Numbers 24: 15, 17-19).

When Jesus did come to earth, many people witnessed His miracles and still couldn’t identify Him. Some people saw Jesus for who He was, is, and is to come with spiritual eyes and recognized He is the Savior, the promised Messiah, the Christ, the Anointed One. But, even those followers experienced spiritual blindness at times, unable to see past the literal, into the eternal.

And they came to Bethsaida. And some people brought to him a blind man and begged him to touch him. And he took the blind man by the hand and led him out of the village, and when he had spit on his eyes and laid his hands on him, he asked him, “Do you see anything?” And he looked up and said, “I see people, but they look like trees, walking.” Then Jesus laid his hands on his eyes again; and he opened his eyes, his sight was restored, and he saw everything clearly. Mark 8:22-25

I have to hold onto the belief that Jesus understands that there are times when I am going to be unseeing, that He continues to offer me grace in spite of my weakness. I have to hold onto the hope that like He did for the blind man, He will lay His hands on me and restore my sight, washing my eyes and allowing me to see clearly.

Yesappa, Thank You for opening my heart to Your sacrifice on the cross, to Your grace and mercy, and inviting me to be Your daughter. Please open my eyes {wider}, so that I am not blinded by temporal distractions, so that I might see You clearly and always remember everything You’ve done and will do in my life. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

Blessings – Julie (writing from Sholavandan)

Unless otherwise indicated, all scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® (ESV®), copyright © 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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2 Chronicles 22, 23; Revelation 10; Zechariah 6; John 9

What others say …

Ahaziah also followed the evil example of King Ahab’s family, for his mother encouraged him in doing wrong. He did what was evil in the Lord’s sight, just as Ahab’s family had done. They even became his advisers after the death of his father, and they led him to ruin. 2 Chronicles 22:3-4 NLT.

What God says …

a priest brings people back under God through obedience; prophecy; rebuilding for the Lord; a blind man sees.

Sometimes the differences between the two can cause a great division of opinion.

16 Some of the Pharisees said, “This man Jesus is not from God, for he is working on the Sabbath.” Others said, “But how could an ordinary sinner do such miraculous signs?” So there was a deep division of opinion among them. John 9:16 NLT.

People might call “treason” when the boat of familiarity and habit gets rocked. Friendships can sever when one follows the Lord and the other follows the crowd. I’ve seen this from various angles in my own life.

A few years ago I read a book by Andy Stanley called The Principle of the Path. In it, he explains how we reach a destination, not by accident, but by a series of steps taken on purpose. The end result may be far from where we planned to be when we started out, but it should come as no surprise when we examine the choices we’ve made that lead us there.

It’s always good to examine myself: who are my influences; where am I weak; what are the choices I’m making and where are they taking me (in health, in my family, in my walk with the Lord)?

Lord, help me to see, and to change. I want to be attuned to your voice.

Courtney (66books365)

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