2 Kings 15-16; Matthew 21

King Jesus enters Jerusalem riding on a donkey and an impromptu parade begins. He heads straight for sacred and cherished real estate, the temple. Anger at what twisted and stoney hearts have sone to God’s temple into drives him to send furniture, people and doves flying. He chases away those who would capitalize on the guilty conscience of others. An odd situation follows; those who are most vulnerable, the blind and the lame approach the One who just scared away the others and receive healing.

What a Savior I have! He claims my heart as his precious real estate and fights to keep it holy, sacred and open to his touch. He claims me as his own and never turns his face from me. I am unworthy, crippled by many things and so often blind to my own need, yet He welcomes me by his side without fail.

I think that the chief priests and elders were right to ask Jesus, “By what authority are you doing these things, and who gave your this authority? Matthew 21:23.  It’s a tragic  that they didn’t want the answer, but after all, who hasn’t denied God’s authority in Jesus at one time or another? It’s when I open my heart to the wonder of who Jesus is and  his love for me that I am drawn into the great mystery of this divine dance.

So Lord, please, turn over the tables of my heart. Clear out those dark and stale places where I strive to keep control. Keep my heart tender and open to you so that I might praise you and thank you for all the beauty and strength you have shown me.  Help me to let go of those small dreams for myself and others so that I can see  and enjoy the freedom and beauty of your hand at work in humble lives. Amen.

klueh

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1 Comment

Filed under 66 Books, Bible in a year reading plan, Matthew, Uncategorized

One response to “2 Kings 15-16; Matthew 21

  1. What a powerful image of God’s fierce love! “He chases away those who would capitalize on the guilty conscience of others.” Your words have a deeper meaning for me when coupled with your prayer, “So Lord, please, turn over the tables of my heart.”Negative thoughts from guilt and shame set up false tables of penance. Yet, rather than fall into the depression of futility, we can “enjoy the freedom and beauty of [God’s] hand at work in humble lives.” Amen and amen!

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