Lev. 18; Ps. 22; Eccles. 1; 1 Tim. 3

Psalm 22

My idea on prayer has been changing greatly lately.  I’ve been reading a book that has revolutionized my thinking about how we pray.

My initial reaction to David’s prayer in Psalm 22 is “How can David say these things to God?” “How can he be so honest about his despair?”  I would have never prayed like that; I always felt that I needed to come to God and say all the things that I thought He wanted to hear.  David comes directly to God expressing his honest feelings with complete faith in God.

God wants me to come to Him in relationship.  He wants me to share myself honestly with Him.

“My God, My God, why have You forsaken me?”

Jesus prays this same prayer from the cross (Matthew 27:46).  Jesus and David demonstrate honest communication with God.  It’s OK for me to tell Him how I feel.  How freeing!

The Psalmist also demonstrates that even in his despair he remembers, knows and trusts in a Sovereign God;

“You are holy, enthroned in the praises of Israel.  Our fathers trusted You; they trusted and You delivered them.  They cried to You and were delivered; they trusted in You and were not ashamed.”

Father, help me to direct my prayers to You honestly always remembering that You are sovereign and faithful.

Kathleen (guest on 66 books)

1 Comment

Filed under 66 Books, Bible in a year reading plan, M'Cheyne Bible reading plan

One response to “Lev. 18; Ps. 22; Eccles. 1; 1 Tim. 3

  1. Kathy

    Welcome Kathleen. Love your post. It made me remember the sudden death of a close friend. I was bereft and angry at God. Another friend gave me some great advice, “It’s ok to be angry at God. He can take whatever emotion you have. It’s not ok to stop talking to him.” I guess our prayers are an act of faith, even when they are not pretty. It’s amazing that he doesn’t squash me even when I am whining and ungrateful, but he uses even that communication to pull me closer to him. Amazing grace I don’t deserve.

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